Easy Breakfasts: Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt

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Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt

If you’re looking for an easy and healthy breakfast to add to your menu, this recipe is just for you. Especially if you’re super busy and don’t have much time in the morning. This Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt breakfast bowl takes less than 10 minutes to make and is packed with the nutrients you need to kickstart your day just right. Time to rise and shine baby!


Below is the list of the post sections, in case you want to jump straight to the Recipe 🙂

Protein for Breakfast
Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt
– Oat Flakes
– Natural Yoghurt
– Fresh Whole Fruits
– Sunflower Seeds
– Chia Seeds

RECIPE: Easy Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt Breakfast


Protein for Breakfast.

Recently I decided to commit seriously to a goal I’ve been playing around with for years: Daily Exercise. For many years I was falling on and off the exercise wagon, and it was time to either commit to it for an extended period of time or leave it in the dust. And so, I started my #100DaysofDailyExerice Challenge. As I write this post, I am on Day 36 – Whoa! What a journey!

When you commit to daily exercise, along the way, you need to see progress to keep you motivated. This is essential, as it propels you forward. And in order to see the maximum results from exercise, you need to watch what you eat.

If you put in all that work exercising every day, but you eat badly, you are obviously not going to see the results you want. And it’s going to be discouraging. Likely leading you to give up altogether.

Eating and Exercise go hand-in-hand. And it’s not about being perfect, and spending hours and tons of cash on weird and wonderful healthy foods. It’s about making small changes over time so that you can build healthier eating habits.

After much research, one of the healthy eating habits to work on was… Starting the day with a good protein-packed breakfast.

This is not always easy for me, as I tend to just want to drink coffee and get on with the day. Are you anything like me?

And so, the journey began to build a new healthy eating habit. Eating breakfasts that included protein, every morning. Being busy, I also wanted something easy and quick to make, and still nutritious. And so, this Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt breakfast bowl was born.

Why Protein?

The proteins found in the foods we eat are used by our bodies to grow, function and develop properly. So, Protein is essential for optimal health.

Eating protein has many, many health benefits. As Dr.Axe says in his Health Benefits of Eating Protein:

Studies show that eating a high-protein diet has a number of health benefits. The benefits of protein in your diet not only help you maintain and lose weight, but protein also works to stabilize your blood sugar levels, improve your ability to learn and concentrate, reduce brain fog, boost your energy levels, support your muscles and bones and support the absorption of important nutrients.

Protein-rich foods help you feel full for longer too. This is great if you’re trying to lose weight, as you feel satisfied after a protein-rich meal, and don’t get the munchies an hour later. When you eat sugar-rich foods, for instance, your blood sugar levels spike up and then drop later on, making you feel hungry. Protein, on the other hand, works at stabilizing blood sugar levels, making you feel full and satisfied for longer.

There are many benefits of eating protein, so why not start off with breakfast right?

Protein Ideas for Breakfast

Obvious protein foods are Meat and Eggs.

But there are many many more tasty protein-rich foods to choose from. Like Nuts, Seeds, Lentils, Beans, Yoghurt, Cheese and Oats.

And so, I decided to put Oats back onto the breakfast menu. Leading me to this very easy and super tasty breakfast, that actually includes a few protein-rich foods: Oats, Yoghurt, Sunflower Seeds and Chia Seeds. A protein-packed breakfast for sure!

Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt


Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt.

This is a super easy and healthy breakfast.

It’s perfect for those who want to eat healthier, but just don’t find the time in the morning. With only a few ingredients and taking less than 10 minutes to make, you have no excuse!

This recipe is also great because you can edit it to suit you. Use this recipe as a base, and then play around with different options – Use your favourite fruits or add different nuts and seeds on top. Make it just right for you!

The 5 wonderful ingredients of this Oats Breakfast are Oats Flakes, Natural Yogurt, Fresh Fruit, Sunflower Seeds, and Chia Seeds. You’ll see the ingredients below (except for the chia seeds).

Stock up your kitchen with these ingredients, and you can whip up this breakfast in minutes, whenever you need. Easy peasy!

Below are all 5 ingredients and each of their benefits.

Oats Flakes.

I grew up eating oats porridge for breakfast. My mother was very strict when it came to breakfasts. Every single morning, for my entire 12 years at school, I ate: Half a banana with plain Bulgarian yoghurt, a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice, and a bowl of oats porridge. Looking back, I’m thinking that my mom was definitely on to something!

Since school days I left oats porridge behind. I think that after 12 years, I needed a break.  But now, 15+ years later, Oats are back on the menu.

What are the different types of Oats?

Oats are the grains from the cereal plant, Avena Sativa.

As Whole Grain Goodness summarizes so well:

Oats are grains from the cereal plant, Avena Sativa, and once harvested are processed for use in animal feed, skin products or food.

For food use, oats are milled, steamed, heated and cooled in a kiln, which brings out the flavour. The oats are then rolled, cut or ground to produce flakes, oatmeal or flour.

There are a few different types of Oats, which can be a little confusing. The Whole Grain Council has nicely summarized Types of Oats list, but here are the most common for you:

Whole Oat Groats – A groat is another name for a grain kernel. Whole oat groats are the result of simply harvesting oats, cleaning them, and removing their inedible hulls. You can most often find these in health food stores. They take the longest to cook.

Steel Cut Oats – If you cut groats into two or three pieces with a sharp metal blade, you get steel cut oats. They cook quicker than oat groats, because water can more easily penetrate the smaller pieces. Steel cut oats are also sometimes called Irish oatmeal.

Rolled Oats – Rolled oats (sometimes called old fashioned oats) are created when oat groats are steamed and then rolled into flakes. This process stabilizes the healthy oils in the oats, so they stay fresh longer, and helps the oats cook faster, by creating a greater surface area.

Rolled Oats – Quick or instant – If you roll the oat flakes thinner, and/or steam them longer, you create quick oats and ultimately instant oats. The nutrition stays the same (these are all whole grains) but the texture changes – a plus for some people and a drawback for others. The good thing about having so many choices is that everyone can get exactly the taste they like best!

Rolled Oats and Oat Flakes are basically the same thing. It’s just the size of the oat flake that changes.

So there are options to choose from.

Also, you can eat Oats is different ways. Raw, soaked overnight or cooked over the stove. In this recipe, I simply enjoy them raw.

The Nutritional Content of 100g of Oats:

Energy1,628 kJ (389 kcal)
Carbohydrates66.3 g
Dietary fiber11.6 g
Fat6.9 g
Protein16.9 g
VitaminsThiamine (B1) 66%, Riboflavin (B2) 12%, Niacin (B3) 6% 0.961 mg, Pantothenic acid (B5) 27%, Vitamin B6 9%, Folate (B9) 14%
MineralsCalcium 5%, Iron 38%, Magnesium 50%, Manganese 233%, Phosphorus 75%, Potassium 9%, Sodium 0%, Zinc 42%
NOTE: The Vitamin and Mineral percentages above are approximated using US daily recommendations. For example: A 100g of Oats will give you 12% of the US Daily recommended amount of Potassium necessary based on this chart. Of course, this is never a definite, so use these percentages as a guideline, more to understand what Vitamins and Minerals you are getting for the foods you eat.
Water8%

From the table above you’ll notice that Oats have many benefits. This gluten-free whole grain contains little-to-no sugar and no salt. It also contains a good amount of fibre and protein, and lots of phosphorous, magnesium and manganese.

Benefits of Eating Oats:

Oats is a great source of vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants. And, at the same time, you’re getting protein too.

There are many benefits of eating oats but here are some of the most prevalent.

Oats provide a higher amount of protein than most other grains, and we already know how good protein is for us. Oats is a great source of fibre, that fills you up for longer – This is really helpful when trying to curb food cravings and lose excess weight. This source of fibre also helps promote healthy bowel movements and ultimately good digestion. Oats contains Beta-glucans which help promote a healthy immune system.

One of the main benefits I enjoy from an Oats Breakfast is that it keeps me feeling nice and full for longer. This is because oats have a low glycemic score. This simply means that when you eat oats, the carbohydrates are released slowly over time. So you won’t get energy spikes, where you feel on top of it and then crash with a tired spell. These kinds of carbs are the best, keeping your blood sugar levels stable.


Natural Yoghurt.

Years ago I discovered the Whole30 cleanse program. For 30 days you cut out food groups like sugar, grains, dairy and legumes, that may be affecting your body in negative ways. It’s a way to reset your body.

And so, I gave up dairy for 30 days. It was not easy, cutting milk out of my tea and coffee, and not eating my favourite yoghurt and fruit breakfast. But, I felt so good after the program that I did it again for another 30 days. Since then, I’ve never really consumed dairy the way I used to. I drink my tea and coffee black and enjoy other dairy-products as more of a delicious treat instead of an everyday occurrence.

Now, all of our bodies are different. Some of you may find dairy totally fine. Others may avoid it like the plague. Each to their own. If you cannot or prefer not to eat dairy, there are alternatives, like coconut milk or cream. Yum!

Either way, quality dairy offers many health benefits. And so we’re adding some tasty Natural Yoghurt to this breakfast recipe.

These days, every few weeks, I’ll get a big tub of yummy natural or greek yoghurt. Over the week I’ll enjoy a lovely yoghurt breakfast every second day or so, alternating with egg breakfasts.

It’s important to get Natural Yoghurt, instead of Flavoured. Often the flavoured yoghurts have a ridiculous amount of sugars added, which is counterproductive when you’re trying to be healthy. If you love that strawberry flavoured yoghurt, just get a quality natural yoghurt and a packet of whole strawberries to go with it. You’ll be getting a lot more essential nutrients this way.

The Nutritional Content of 100g of Yoghurt (Greek, plain, unsweetened):

Energy406 kJ (97 kcal)
Carbohydrates3.98 g
Sugars4 g
Dietary fiber0 g
Fat5 g
Protein9 g
VitaminsVitamin A equiv. beta-Carotene 26 μg, lutein zeaxanthin 22 μg, Thiamine (B1) 2%, Riboflavin (B2) 23%, Niacin (B3) 1%, Pantothenic acid (B5) 7%, Vitamin B6 5%, Folate (B9) 1%, Vitamin B12 31%, Choline 3%, Vitamin C 0%
MineralsCalcium 10%, Iron 0%, Magnesium 3%, Manganese 0%, Phosphorus 19%, Potassium 3%, Sodium 2%, Zinc 5%
Selenium9.7 µg
NOTE: The Vitamin and Mineral percentages above are approximated using US daily recommendations. For example: A 100g of Yoghurt will give you 12% of the US Daily recommended amount of Potassium necessary based on this chart. Of course, this is never a definite, so use these percentages as a guideline, more to understand what Vitamins and Minerals you are getting for the foods you eat.
Water81.3 g

Benefits of Eating Yoghurt:

As you see from the table above, Yoghurt is rich in Calcium, Phosphorous and many of the B Vitamins. It’s also a pretty good source of Protein.

Calcium promotes healthy teeth and bones. B vitamins, particularly vitamin B12 and riboflavin can protect against heart disease. Minerals like phosphorus, magnesium and potassium are essential for many of our biological processes, such as regulating blood pressure.

Yoghurt also has a pretty impressive amount of Protein. Apart from the many benefits of protein, it’ll also helps with appetite regulation, keeping you nicely full until the next meal comes around.

Many types of yoghurts also contain live bacteria, probiotics. This can help promote healthy digestion.


Fresh Whole Fruits.

Fresh whole fruits are a wonderful source of essential nutrients and fibre.

However, just be aware that, while they are highly nutritious, they can be high in sugar. If you’re looking to lose some excess weight, keep eating fruit for breakfast. For the rest of the day, if you feel like a snack, opt for snacking on vegetables instead of fruits. Start looking at fruit as a wonderful treat and not a regular snack.

When picking your fruits, there are so many to choose from! A good place to start is with the seasons. Check out this Seasonal Fruit Chart to see what’s in season. Then, pick those fruits. They’ll likely be their freshest, and you’ll start trying out different fruits throughout the year, instead of the same old same old.

You’ll also discover that often, fruits that are in the same seasons, go really well together. At the moment, it’s Summer in Italy. Apricots, Black Cherries and Nectarines are in full swing, and it’s a beautiful thing!

Benefits of eating fresh whole fruit:

Different fruits will have their own unique set of nutrients, but there are some general benefits they offer.

Fruits are wonderful natural sources of Vitamins and Minerals, essential for proper functioning of the body. They are also high in Fibre, which promotes healthy digestion. Many fruits are also rich in Potassium which helps keep blood sugar levels regulated.

Generally speaking, eating fresh whole fruits offer many health benefits. From boosting energy, preventing diseases, bone health, skin care and lots more. Check out the specific health benefits of the fruits you eat to get a better idea.


Sunflower Seeds.

Sunflower seeds are basically the fruits of the sunflower.

I’ve loved these guys for as long as I can remember. This love affair probably started in college because they are a pretty cheap alternative to nuts, with all the nutritional benefits. Nom Nom Nom.

The Nutritional Content of 100g of Sunflower Seeds (kernels, dried):

Energy2,445 kJ (584 kcal)
Carbohydrates20 g
Sugars2.62 g
Dietary fiber8.6 g
Fat51.46 g
Saturated4.455 g
Monounsaturated18.528 g
Polyunsaturated23.137 g
Protein20.78 g
VitaminsThiamine (B1) 129%, Riboflavin (B2) 30%, Niacin (B3) 56%, Pantothenic acid (B5) 23%, Vitamin B6 103%, Folate (B9) 57%, Choline 11%, Vitamin C 2%, Vitamin E 234%,
MineralsCalcium 8%, Iron 40%, Magnesium 92%, Manganese 93%, Phosphorus 94%, Potassium 14%, Sodium 1%, Zinc 53%
NOTE: The Vitamin and Mineral percentages above are approximated using US daily recommendations. For example: A 100g of Sunflower Seeds will give you 12% of the US Daily recommended amount of Potassium necessary based on this chart. Of course, this is never a definite, so use these percentages as a guideline, more to understand what Vitamins and Minerals you are getting for the foods you eat.
Water4.7 g

Benefits of eating sunflower seeds:

Oh, where do I start!

From looking at the table above, you’ll notice that these seeds are a great source of Protein, Good (unsaturated) Fats, and Fibre. They also contain lots of the B Vitamins, Vitamin E, Magnesium, Manganese and Phosphorous. As well as Zinc, Iron and lots more.

You’ll get a good dose of Protein, that’s for sure. The Fibre will promote good digestion. And the various Vitamins and Minerals will promote the healthy functioning of almost all your body’s internal processes in some way.

There are many health benefits of sunflower seeds – From improving cholesterol, promoting healthy bone and skin health, regulating blood sugar and lots more.

Sunflower seeds really are one of the best foods to add to your diet. Eat as a snack or sprinkle them over salads, soups or yoghurt-fruit breakfasts like this one.


Chia Seeds.

Another great source of protein is the Chia Seed. Oh, the blessed Chia Seed!

Chia Seeds are the edible seed of Salvia hispanica, a flowering plant of the mint family, native to Central America.

Because Chia Seeds have a mild flavour, they can be easily added to many different foods for a protein kick. Sprinkle over salads, soups, sauces, vegetables, yoghurt, smoothies, you name it. Chia seeds can also be soaked in liquid, like milk or water.

Are Chia Seeds better soaked?

Eating Chia Seeds as is (like in this recipe) still provides lots of nutrients. However, soaked chia seeds are easier to digest and the nutrients are better absorbed and assimilated in your body.

This recipe focuses on a quick and easy breakfast, packed with nutrients. The sprinkle of Chia Seeds is simply an extra splash of nutrients. The cherry on top so to speak.

However, if you have more time and want to increase the nutritional content, you can soak your chia seeds overnight. You can soak them in water or a milk, adding about 2 tablespoons of Chia Seeds for every cup of liquid. Stir the mix regularly for a few minutes, until the chia seeds look evenly spread and aren’t clumping at the bottom. Leave covered in the fridge overnight. In the morning, you will find a tasty gel-like mixture that you can add to this recipe along with the oats, fruit and nuts.

Or… you can leave this recipe just the way it is, and try this second Soaked Chia Pudding recipe. Now you have 2 breakfast recipes in your kit! 🙂

The Nutritional Content of 100g of Chia seeds (dried, raw):

Energy486 kcal (2,030 kJ)
Carbohydrates42.1 g
Dietary fiber34.4 g
Fat30.7 g
Protein16.5 g
VitaminsVitamin A equiv. 7%, Thiamine (B1) 54%, Riboflavin (B2) 14%, Niacin (B3) 59%, Folate (B9) 12%, Vitamin C 2%, Vitamin E 3%
MineralsCalcium 63%, Iron 59%, Magnesium 94%, Manganese 130%, Phosphorus 123%, Potassium 9%, Zinc 48%
NOTE: The Vitamin and Mineral percentages above are approximated using US daily recommendations. For example: A 100g of Chia Seeds will give you 12% of the US Daily recommended amount of Potassium necessary based on this chart. Of course, this is never a definite, so use these percentages as a guideline, more to understand what Vitamins and Minerals you are getting for the foods you eat.
Water5.8 g

Benefits of eating Chia Seeds

As you see, Chia Seeds are packed with quality Protein and Fibre. They’re also jampacked with many essential Vitamins and Minerals – The B Vitamins, Manganese, Phosphorous, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, and Zinc. It’s no wonder Chia Seeds are referred to as a Super Food.

Being so high in nutrients, the list of the health benefits of Chia Seeds is long, including the promotion of skin heart and digestive health.


Okay friends, now it’s time to eat this lovely mixture. Enjoy!

Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt


Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt:

DifficultyBeginner

A super easy, nutritious and yummy breakfast, perfect for those who want to be healthy but don't have much time. This Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt Breakfast only has 5 ingredients and takes less than 10 minutes to make. Note: This recipe's quantities serve 2 medium portions. However, adjust to your preferences. You could eat all of it yourself!

Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt

Prep Time10 mins

 0.50 cup Rolled Oats or Oat Flakes
 8 tbsp Natural Full Cream Yoghurt
 1 cup Whole Fruit
 2 tbsp Sunflower Seeds
 1 tbsp Chia Seeds

1

Mix Rolled Oats with Natural Yoghurt together nicely. Portion mixture into your breakfast bowls (this recipe serves 2 medium portions)

2

Top with Chopped Fruit, Nuts and Seeds. Enjoy!

Ingredients

 0.50 cup Rolled Oats or Oat Flakes
 8 tbsp Natural Full Cream Yoghurt
 1 cup Whole Fruit
 2 tbsp Sunflower Seeds
 1 tbsp Chia Seeds

Directions

1

Mix Rolled Oats with Natural Yoghurt together nicely. Portion mixture into your breakfast bowls (this recipe serves 2 medium portions)

2

Top with Chopped Fruit, Nuts and Seeds. Enjoy!

Rolled Oats with Fruit and Yoghurt

If you found this article useful, please share it – It’d be great to inspire others to start their days with better protein-packed breakfasts. Even if they have very little time, it’s still possible with simple recipes like this one! 🙂


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